Clientside hero banner image

“In the end we’re selling our expertise, we’re selling our solutions, we’re selling our thinking.”

Welcome Chris Peat

Global Senior Manager, Digital Marketing

BearingPoint

View LinkedIn Profile

Chris Peat is the Global Head of Digital Marketing at BearingPoint. He leads digital marketing, websites and social media channels across Europe and beyond, managing digital agencies and a nearshore team.

He discusses B2B technology trends, how digital marketing has changed and how BearingPoint has responded to COVID 19.

Transcript:

Nathan Anibaba:

Chris Peat is the Global Head Of Digital Marketing at BearingPoint. He helps companies of all shapes and sizes make the most out of digital marketing platforms and channels. He is best when coaching people in teams, developing digital marketing strategy, launching new websites and services, looking under the hood at data and giving insights, managing external agencies, and most of all, looking at what opportunities tomorrow can bring. Chris Peat, welcome to ClientSide.

Chris Peat:

Thanks a lot, Nathan, and thanks a lot for the invite. It’s a pleasure to join.

Nathan Anibaba:

Absolute pleasure having you on the show. Your history and background is really fascinating. You get your degree from the University of Salford in multimedia and in internet technology. What did you think you were going to do with your career at that time?

Chris Peat:

Back then, I suppose it was really a little bit different. Everyone was talking about new media. We were still putting things on big disks, floppy disks, zip drives. I remember taking these big plastic things into university at the time, and it felt like it was really the cutting edge of technology. It felt really, really like you were on the cusp of something new. I think we’d just had the dot-com boom at the time. Everything felt really, really exciting at the time. It was one of the first courses going in this direction and you thought you were on to something new, but you didn’t know whether it would really take off. It’s like that old joke, “The internet will never take off.” Thankfully it was a really good choice.

Chris Peat:

But I definitely, when I was at university, had different aspirations. I wanted to move into some sort of agency environment. I always thought I’d be doing something cool like festival websites, band websites. I guess, in that new media thing, you were also doing a lot of things with animations, with videos. So I thought my direction of travel was really going to be like this. If I could say one thing that I knew I definitely wasn’t going to do choosing this cool course, I wouldn’t be with the suits. I wouldn’t be in this business environment doing B2B marketing, but that happened.

Nathan Anibaba:

This is where we are today. Really interesting. So you see your roles have been very technical to date. A lot of development, a lot of website building, e-commerce, CMS, et cetera. How do you go from very technical roles in your previous roles to, now, marketing?

Chris Peat:

I suppose for me, it’s being able to find that red thread in your own career and see what transverses from one thing to another. And in a technical role, you can either be super, super technical, or you can be a bit technical, a bit designer, a bit solution-orientated. And I was always this halfway house between a designer and a developer at the beginning, which is a bit of a laugh now looking back on it, because I wasn’t the most brilliant of developers and I wasn’t the most brilliant of designers. And I thought, what I need to find a way through this that really works for me.

Chris Peat:

And for me it was this whole… One of the big things early on in my career doing websites was thinking on a supply side, on agency side, if you like. I was working at a software house at the time. You deliver these solutions, but then you go off into the night and the customer takes it forward. What happens with it past then? How do you make it a success? Those things that you make a decision on early on, did they really work or not? And so marketing and digital marketing was that forward ongoing bit. It was about having the faith to sit with the project and see it all the way through its life-cycle instead of just developing it and passing on the baton at the first time.

Chris Peat:

So for me, it was a really natural fit into digital marketing, if you like, and those bits of motivation of how people use things, of how people interact, looking at the KPIs, it made everything so much more interesting. And I realized that this niche, if you like, in between the two things… And it’s not a niche marketing, right, but it felt like it at the time to me. I was really, really good at that. If I could be more confident about my designing and developing skills, this role in the middle of being the customer of these solutions and being able to take them forward, get them to work, manage your KPIs, get success, run campaigns, I just realized this was something I really, really enjoyed. And so I was really happy, and I’m still really happy, in finding that role into digital marketing. And I think it then it’s this blend of creativity, marketing, usage. I really like it.

Nathan Anibaba:

And what does that blend of left-brain, right-brain thinking give you and your employer today? It’s that combination of your technical background, design background, but also your digital marketing expertise. What does that bring to an employer?

Chris Peat:

I think for an employer, it brings them a much safer pair of hands. You can see a lot of the times the digital marketing guys, pure-bred digital marketing, pure-play digital marketing, they’re very, very focused on their campaigns, on their conversion rates, on their clicks, their KPIs, but the technicalities of how you deliver it, they don’t really know. Again, the technical guys it’s a bit more black-and-white with them. Does it work, yes or no?

Chris Peat:

And I suppose on top of this, I have a slight business background with an MBA. And so you get this well-rounded ability to say, what does the company want? How does this technically get achieved? How do you do it? Because being able to sit in a room and not just say what you want to do, but how you’ll do it, how you’ll bring a team together and that marketing mix of why it will work, why you need to make certain decisions and that depth, means that you’ve got a lot more depth to your own character. It means that a company can really believe in what you’re saying. You’re able to deliver on big ambitions for a company. And I think internally, you’re also able to speak with a lot of credibility. And externally, when you’re looking at suppliers, you also able to talk with that same credibility, so you can get a lot of things done, I think, that you couldn’t, if you were just pure digital marketing or technical or pure marketing as well. So it’s a good blend. It’s a good complementary skillset.

Nathan Anibaba:

So let’s talk a little bit about BearingPoint. You’re now Global Head Of Digital Marketing at the company. Tell us a little bit more about them, and what problems do you solve for the company?

Chris Peat:

Well, BearingPoint’s a European-based business consultancy. It’s a little bit like [Europe Plus Plus 00:00:06:36]. So it’s not one of the huge giant global businesses like Deloitte, KPMG, with this huge footprint, but it’s a mid-size player. It operates mainly in Europe, but it’s also got bases in the US, in China. And it’s really focused on this technology and business consulting. And it works across a range of verticals, be it automotive, industrial manufacturing, financial services.

Chris Peat:

So it’s a really interesting company. It’s really dynamic. It’s always changing. Size-wise, it’s about 4-5,000 people. So it has a unique place, if you like, with all the other mid-tier consultancy players, but it’s quite an interesting one. It pitches itself as a bit more dynamic, a bit younger, a bit fresher. And for me at BearingPoint, I’m leading the digital marketing. So I’m looking after all of our digital presences. They’ve grown quite a lot now. So that’s covering all of the countries. It’s including probably about 20-plus websites now, although we have some bigger websites that are our main ones, and then a few more agile tactical instances. I’m also looking after our social media channels, our overall digital strategy, supplier set-up and our support team for digital marketing across the business.

Chris Peat:

So it’s quite a big role. But one of the things that BearingPoint, and I suppose one of the standout things at BearingPoint, are the people, and I suppose that’s why I’m still here six-odd years later, because everyone in this business is really, really friendly, really nice, really approachable, but also very knowledgeable. So it’s a lot of fun working at BearingPoint. It’s a lot of fun doing their digital marketing. And it’s a lot of fun looking at the business challenges that we have each year, as the market shifts, as we bring in new solutions. I think it’s one of those really overplayed things. I wouldn’t say every day feels different, but certainly every year feels different at BearingPoint.

Nathan Anibaba:

So let’s talk a little bit about that in more detail, because you mentioned the market shifting then, and we’ll come onto the COVID-19 question in a moment and how it’s affected the business. But you work with agencies all over the world, Germany, Spain, the US, Romania, Sweden, the UK, et cetera. Talk a little bit about some of biggest differences you find with managing agents in different countries.

Chris Peat:

Well, so I’ve worked with different agencies at different times and in different companies. So maybe it’s the moments in time that change, but they do all have their nuances. So in the end, people are people and 80% of good spirit, good communication, gets you through. But as you start to work with agencies in different countries, for me, definitely you can get stuck on some really small culture issues, just on a work perspective.

Chris Peat:

I definitely always found in the UK, it was always a bit of a trade. It was always a bit of a discussion. You needed to really agree the big picture, and then you dial into the detail, but you never start with the detail. You have to agree the big picture, the direction, before you can go into the other things. If you’re both heading in the right direction, there’s a confidence you want to go further together. In other markets it’s been interesting, because you’ve got to be incredibly detail-orientated. They want to know everything before you can start to talk about price. There’s no big picture without the small detail. Other agencies have been a little bit keen on the oversell, if you can imagine it’s probably more the US, a little bit patronizing sometimes, but always wanting to do a little bit more salesmanship in some of the things they’re doing. Maybe it’s just my interaction with a smaller selection of agencies.

Chris Peat:

But probably the biggest lesson I ever learned was clear communication. We were working with a supplier from Southern Europe and they were able to agree a big picture, and you walked into it thinking the detail is a given. And I think on that level, the detail worked out not to be okay. There was a really, really good team, really, really nice people. They absolutely wanted to get to the right place, but it just turned out we couldn’t deliver it that well and you had to have been a little bit more precise in communication, a little bit more precise in the deliverables. And for me, it was a good lesson, again, that some of the things that carried you through don’t always in different set-ups.

Chris Peat:

So it’s definitely a different picture working with agencies in different countries. There’s commonalities, and there’s obviously exceptions. So you can’t say because you had one experience with one, it translates to all of them, but at least you get a feel for it. You feel that with some, you need to be a bit more detail-orientated. That’s what they’ll really appreciate. With others, it’s agree the big picture, and for others, it’s make sure that we can really, really deliver this because you need to make it.

Chris Peat:

But in amongst it all, I don’t know whether it’s because I’m just biased towards our home crowd, I really like working with UK agencies. I don’t know whether it’s this heritage of film and media in the UK. I think we’ve also been big players in advertising, but the creative process in the UK always feels a bit more fun. I quite like our way of working, and probably it’s just because I’m a UK guy in the end, but I do like that process that we have here in the UK.

Nathan Anibaba:

I do think the UK agency scene leads the world in many aspects of the agency delivery process. And I think it is the envy of many agencies from around the world. Let’s talk a little bit about COVID-19 and the impact specifically it’s had on marketing at BearingPoint. What were some of the biggest challenges you had at the company from a marketing point of view when COVID first hit, and how have you responded?

Chris Peat:

So, I mean, for us at BearingPoint, we’re no different to any other business. It hits us, it hits our clients, and you have to look and see, well, what does this mean from our marketing perspective? As a consultancy, a lot of our marketing tends to be on the traditional side. It tends to be on relationship-building. So you can factor in a big roster of events. I think almost overnight, everybody realized this is going to change things, at least in the short term.

Chris Peat:

So for me, it was really, really interesting, I’ve got to say. You know certain bad things are happening around you, so you can’t say it’s a good time, but it’s definitely an interesting time, because it was the moment where digital marketing really became an important thing of what we do. It became a bit more front-and-center than some of that relationship-building, which is obviously important, but it was going to be our new channel for that relationship building during these times.

Chris Peat:

So we really started to look and say, “Okay, what do we need to do to shift? What do we need to do to be able to encompass some of those needs that we have as a marketing team?” We did a lot of horizon-scanning. We looked at what Google were doing, because they released new things, new metadata information, or rich snippets for Google search. And we started to really push out into, how do we strengthen our digital event proposition? How do we embed webinars more onto our website? How do we do things like video-on-demand? How do we improve some of the content marketing things? Some of those improvements that you wanted to make the content marketing but had been lower down the roster of your work all of a sudden went to the top.

Chris Peat:

And I guess we would really start to then look and see each week, are we really reacting in the same way as others? Have we got the right features? Have we got the right content? Are we providing the information to our customers online, but they’re going to expect to see us? Because at this moment in time, you can’t be the one website that looks like COVID didn’t happen. You can’t be the one website that thinks everything will be okay against it. We’re just not going to react to this. So we did, we reacted in quite a strong way with content, with virtual events, with promoting this, with really pitching our voice. But it was, and still is… I mean, it feels like it’s calming down a bit, but it’s been a really interesting few months for me and my team and our wider marketing team as well. We’ve had challenges, but we’ve overcome them really well.

Nathan Anibaba:

Now, aside from the marketing challenges, there are also technical challenges of COVID-19. There’s a human element of this moving people to remote-working environments, setting them up with tablets and devices and connectivity, et cetera, et cetera. We’re potentially past that moment now. Now that where we are in this new working-from-home environment, talk a little bit about what the new challenges are that you’re facing now, specifically as it relates to the marketing team, and how are you overcoming them?

Chris Peat:

Some of the new challenges I think we’ve got as our marketing team is, now that you’ve been able to react quite quickly, you’ve done some of those plasters like creating content, pushing content out, making sure that we’ve got a voice, you’ve got some bigger unknown answers now. And especially, as I alluded to earlier, that we have a lot of events. What do you do about those events? How do you manage some of these really big virtual events that you’re now going to launch? How will you manage that relationship building in the mid-term?

Chris Peat:

Because, okay, you can use digital channels to do this in the short term. You can say, “Okay, we need to move things to social media.” You can say, “Okay, we need to move it to a campaign.” And for sure, that we’ll see you through your first three, six months, but it can’t be the only thing in the end. People like talking to people. So I think probably one of the biggest challenges from a marketing communication side is how do we do that forward?

Chris Peat:

Nobody knows what this is going to look like, but there’s a lot of talk about a second wave of COVID. Nobody knows how that will be managed across Europe, across Asia, across the States. And you see a very different response, even. Europe is opening up, Asia still seems like it’s open in its own country, but it doesn’t really want to do so much outside. They’re still a bit more reserved with international travel. The US is going through its own challenges. And how will you open up across those borders? How will you start to integrate with your clients? I think that’s probably the big unanswered question now. Nobody’s entirely certain of how long this will go on for, and what does your next stage of this marketing response look like? So I would say we’ve got open questions, not answers, but I’d say it will also continue to be interesting in the months ahead.

Nathan Anibaba:

Really interesting. Let’s talk a little bit about thought leadership. We’ve we’ve been told for many years that thought leadership is definitely the way to go in B2B. It creates trust. It conveys credibility. It tells the customer that we know about the world and that you should talk to us before you talk to anyone else or before you make a decision. But on the flip side of that, everyone is doing it these days. Everyone’s creating content and thought leadership. So now traditional thought leadership no longer confers advantage in the way that it once done in the past. Discuss.

Chris Peat:

I think for me, thought leadership is still really, really important actually. Thought leadership, research, original thinking, in our business it’s still really one of those vital things, because in the end where we’re selling our expertise, we’re selling our solutions, we’re selling our thinking. So if you can’t demonstrate it, people struggle to have a trust in you. But the change is that it’s no longer winner-takes-all. It’s not that you can, in your marketing, just start to do thought leadership and you’ll stand out and you’ll be the most credible player in the market, because as you say, everybody’s doing it.

Chris Peat:

So it moves into more of a hygiene factor. If you’re not doing it, you’re simply just not that credible. But it becomes difficult because I think at one stage there was really a push even… And I don’t want to say it’s quantity over quality, because quality is always important, but there was also a view of try and get as much out as you can to a reasonable point. And I think now you really see that push in thought leadership onto real quality. Quality of research, quality of thinking. But also, from a marketing perspective, quality of delivery, quality of content, I think looking at creativity and how it’s developed. The idea that I suppose you can write a piece, launch it on your website and not do much more, feels a bit like it’s gone. So looking at different formats, looking at interactions. How do you make something really, really interesting because exactly that. You need to stand out, then. You need to be the gems in a field of coal, so to say, to really push, push this out.

Chris Peat:

And I think that’s where people will struggle then, because if you move much more into this quality aspect, it changes the game a little bit. But it will be interesting to see how thought leadership goes and moves forward. But I definitely think for us at BearingPoint, we’ll look a lot at our creativity and how we deliver it, how that backs up your overall brand experience rather than just content, content, content, and KPIs, like we’ve [crosstalk 00:20:10].

Nathan Anibaba:

For content’s sake.

Chris Peat:

Yeah, exactly.

Nathan Anibaba:

There you go. So it still has to be done, but it has to be done with even more creativity and innovation.

Chris Peat:

Exactly, exactly. And perhaps focusing in a little bit more, so doing less better.

Nathan Anibaba:

Really interesting. One of the interesting things that surprised you about BearingPoint was what different countries want from their websites, be that France, Germany, the Nordics, et cetera, i.e. what content they wanted, how they used content, how they use social media. Talk a little bit about that.

Chris Peat:

I suppose when I joined BearingPoint, perhaps I was in a bit of a naive moment, but I was predominantly working on UK projects at the time before that. I thought that I really understood everything. I thought, “Yeah, I’m really quite good at this digital marketing game.” And when you took on a more international role, it felt like you just had to replicate what you’re doing everywhere else. But for some reason or another, we decided let’s have a look and see. How are other organizations pitching themselves? How are main websites in professional services and news outlets in sport, even, in media, how do they portray themselves in different countries?

Chris Peat:

And we went on a not-very-scientific route round of just looking at websites and making notes, but it became a bit surprising to me at the time, but something that feels obvious was reflection, in that they were all subtly different. I mean, the UK feels quite a lot like the US in terms of its content, or at least it did when we did our review. It was still a bit more aspirational, but a bit more wild, a bit flashy, lots of content everywhere. You saw the Nordic websites that all felt a little bit more sparse, a little bit more cool, a little bit more clean without maybe some of the unnecessary items that we had in our UK websites. By the time we got to Germany, they felt very focused on content, on authority, but it was everything without the fluff.

Nathan Anibaba:

I see. No frills.

Chris Peat:

No extras, no frills. And then by the time we got to France, you could go to some websites and literally you could just see a big video on the screen and play it and a few words, and that was it. And it was, wow, really, really aspirational. We did this review a few years ago. So I quite imagine that things have moved on, that they’ve perhaps converse a little bit more now. But you realized even at this part that the different countries would consume things differently, they’d react differently to different content. And you see that sometimes in the KPIs that we look at.

Chris Peat:

You also saw in social media that if your website had to be a bit more open in how it worked for different countries, your social media approach definitely did. I came in thinking, “LinkedIn will take over the world everywhere,” and you realize the further East you moved, into Eastern Europe, into Russia, it became a lot less of a thing. And over towards the UK and in the US it was much more. You saw over the last years it really growing in Germany and France. I think it’s really a critical item now. But you definitely see the difference in the way that social channels are used and the way that websites are used in the content delivery.

Chris Peat:

There’s still the pillars that everybody uses, but how we use it and what we do is definitely a different approach in each country. So I learned quite quickly you can’t roll out one blueprint, everybody follows it and we’ll all get success, because it’s not like that. So I think one of the most important things that I realized then was everybody needs to have enough support around them. We need to have good platforms that can enable them, guidance, but most importantly, everybody needs freedom in a country to get their own success. That’s been really, really important, I think. Being really open, saying it’s not just one way, my approach or no approach, that’s really been critical, but I think that openness is always a good idea in any role. So we did that. It’s worked. It continues to work. So definitely, yeah, thinking in a more international role that everything’s going to be just a little bit different is a good idea.

Nathan Anibaba:

Really, really fascinating. Chris, final question before we get into our speed-round, which we ask everyone that comes onto the podcast. Selecting an agency partner is probably one of the most important decisions that a client can make. It’s pretty easy to pick up the phone and, on the spot, hire a new agency. It’s far more difficult to find an ideal partner to really reshape your approach and the way that you think about marketing to propel the business forward. What’s the best way, in your opinion, for a client to choose a strategic agency partner?

Chris Peat:

I think, and I always find this a bit interesting because I fit the mold of an ideal customer journey. But for me, I’ve chosen quite a few agencies over the years. I think I’ve got a reasonable process for doing this. It’s a little bit like doing something that you’re just completely used to, and I follow the same process all the way along. But for me, it starts off being honest with yourself. Defining the scope of the arrangement that you want with your next agency, understanding what your budget is, is really, really critical.

Chris Peat:

And making sure that you don’t dream for partners way beyond your own pockets. I remember once picking up a phone to an agency and saying, “You know, can you do this and this and this?” And they were really, really blunt with me already, and they said, “Look, our starting price is half a million. Have you got that?” At the time, I could tell you what definitely didn’t. So you know that you have to pitch the services you want to buy in with the right partner. You need to be important to that client. And so I think that starts to find the fit.

Chris Peat:

I suppose the second part that I’ve go on to with them is to really look at the social proof. So I’m interested to know, from friends, from colleagues, have you worked with them? Did you know them? I’m also really interested in case studies. I really like to see what you’ve done. If you’ve ran campaigns, if you’ve done solutions, I’ll have a look at them. If you name clients, I’ll see what they’re doing and see if I think they’re good.

Chris Peat:

And then you get to the point where you have actually have to meet them. So you’ve made your telephone calls, your introductions, and usually when you’re trying to find a reasonable partner, it comes to meeting them. And sometimes you just have to trust your gut. And that’s a terrible thing to say in a process, but I think it’s also true. You can do all the research that you want, but sometimes you meet the people and you think, “There’s no way I want to work with them.” And when you’re bringing in an agency in such an important role, you’re probably going to be talking to them every week. And if you don’t like the guys, you’re not going to want to talk to them every week. So…

Nathan Anibaba:

That trusting your gut thing is really important. And I think a lot of people underplay the significance and importance of that. I mean, if you listen to anything that behavioral science says, trusting your gut and instinct really comes from pattern recognition and the fact that you’ve seen this so many times before, so you develop almost a sixth sense of what people are going to be like and what the experience is going to be like, before you actually make the decision.

Chris Peat:

Exactly, exactly. And probably you’re really right in that comment as well, because we’ve also over the years hired agencies and sometimes it’s not worked. And so exactly that part of your gut reaction says, “This feels like it’s going to [crosstalk 00:27:56] in our previous experiences. This is going to be a guy that’s really going to be difficult, or the guy’s selling you something really good, but the team don’t look like they can back it up.”

Nathan Anibaba:

We’ve been here before.

Chris Peat:

We’ve been here before. And we have been here before, but no, these days we’re usually quite good, or I’m usually quite good, at selecting agencies, at least for my part of marketing, that I want to work with. But it is that. It’s finding the fit. Finding the right size. I also think that you need to make sure, from a size perspective, you’re an important customer for that agency. And finding people that work with you in a good way,

Nathan Anibaba:

Really interesting. Chris, just bringing the interview towards a close now, let’s get into our speed round. These are the more fun questions that we ask everyone that comes on to the show. So I’ll fire some questions at you. If you can fire some answers back, that would be great. Which CMO in your opinion is doing the best job in marketing right now?

Chris Peat:

At least the one that I think is most interesting is Just Eat. The brand feels very challenging. The campaigns are really, really bold. It looks a lot of fun. And I think home delivery in COVID times, the Snoop Dogg campaign… CMR would just be… It’s the one. I think it’s a really good job, right?

Nathan Anibaba:

Yeah. Good shout. In your opinion, are agencies or luxury or necessity? What do agencies offer that’s so unique that the client can’t replicate or achieve by themselves?

Chris Peat:

I think for me, it’s outside influence. More than all of the things that the agency probably wants to be known for, it’s that outside influence. I think internally you just become an echo-chamber in the end. I think agencies are absolutely essential, not a luxury, but it’s the outside influence that they bring.

Nathan Anibaba:

Really interesting. What’s the single thing that you love about working with agencies, and what do you dislike or what frustrates you about working with agencies?

Chris Peat:

Okay. I suppose what I like is excitement. I really want to know what you’re doing for your other clients, what’s really, really cool. Tell me something new, get me excited, get me to want to do something really different. I really like that part of working with agencies. So probably conversely, the other part that really frustrates me is when you just get stale solutions, old thinking, boring pitches, from what I then always class as lazy agencies. I mean, probably it’s because what I like is the excitement that what I hate is the really stale solutions.

Nathan Anibaba:

Really interesting. At times, we all hit a low point. COVID-19, I’m sure at the beginning, hit all of us in a similar way. How do you motivate yourself when we do hit those low points?

Chris Peat:

For me, it’s probably a bad answer, but I like to just get away. When everything has just become too much, I always think you need a break. Sometimes I like to be a bit inspired. You visit a new country, you see how they do things. You see just little bits. You know how, when you’re visiting a restaurant, you’re booking it, the retail experiences, and you can bring some of that inspiration home. So I think for me, it’s get away. Easy. Go on more holidays [crosstalk 00:31:09] to motivate yourself.

Nathan Anibaba:

Good answer.

Chris Peat:

I don’t know if my boss would agree, but go on more holidays.

Nathan Anibaba:

Definitely, definitely. What excites you most about your current role and position?

Chris Peat:

Again, probably quite an easy answer. It’s the company. It’s really dynamic. The projects that you work on really reflect that. It’s a really interesting place to work. So being in digital marketing at BearingPoint is a good place to be.

Nathan Anibaba:

And my final question, Chris. What’s the single biggest thing that you’re yet to achieve that you’d like to achieve in your career?

Chris Peat:

I mean, I’ve been really thrilled with my journey so far, but in the future, if I was to do something that I’ve not yet done, I guess it would be to start something new on my own. I don’t know what that would look like. I’ve never really been able to answer that question, but I think that’s definitely [inaudible 00:31:58]. You’ve done all of these things for years for other people. What would you do on your own? I’m not sure what I’d do on my own, but I’ll let you know when I get there.

Nathan Anibaba:

But it’s an itch you want to scratch. Really interesting.

Chris Peat:

Yeah, yeah. Absolutely.

Nathan Anibaba:

Fantastic. Chris, thank you for being a guest on the show.

Chris Peat:

Great. Thanks a lot.

Nathan Anibaba:

If you’d like to share any comments on this episode or any episode of ClientSide, then find us online at fox.agency. If you’d like to appear as a guest on the show, please email millyfox.agency. The people that make the show possible are Milly Bell and Natasha Rosic, our booker/researcher. David Clare is our head of content. Ben Fox is our executive producer. I’m Nathan Anibaba. You’ve been listening to ClientSide on Fox Agency. [inaudible 00:32:53] next time on ClientSide on Fox Agency.

Available On:

Clientside guest image

Be our guest

If you’re a world-leading B2B marketeer, or you’d like to suggest a guest for the show, we’d love to hear from you.

Get in touch

Get ClientSide in your inbox

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.