Skip to content

From cell phones to cybersecurity: the reinvention of a global brand

“The ransomware group, DarkSide, actually cited our product as stopping them. That’s the kind of endorsement you want.”

This weeks episode of the ClientSide podcast, Nathan Anibaba and Brian Clevenger, VP of Corporate Marketing at BlackBerry, dive into a fascinating discussion of the “greatest story that’s never been told”. Listen in to this fascinating episode find out more about how the globally well-known former producer of revolutionary mobile devices pivoted into cybersecurity. 

Transcript:

Speaker 1: 

This is ClientSide, from Fox Agency. 

 

Speaker 2: 

Hit it. That’s what I’m talking about. Wait, okay now, from the beginning. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Brian Clevenger is the VP of Corporate Marketing at BlackBerry. His leadership experience covers over 20 years of building brands, relationships, and entire businesses for both clients and agencies. Currently, he is Vice President of Corporate Marketing at BlackBerry; the once secure handset manufacturer turned cybersecurity company. We’ll talk about that in more detail in a moment. Brian oversees brand, creative, web, campaigns, project management, and media and is leading the company’s largest global rebrand in over seven years. Prior to BlackBerry, Brian was the Senior Director at Veritas, leading the rebrand of the data management company and managing the brand and creative teams. Brian Clevenger, welcome to ClientSide. 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Awesome. Thanks for having me, Nathan. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Super- excited to have you on the show. You’ve got a really impressive CV and background. You were former creative director at Veritas leading the rebrand, as we said, you’ve got agency experience from publicist Grey Worldwide. You’ve worked on brands like BMW, Cisco, FedEx, McAfee. Just go down the list of some iconic names. How do all of these experiences inform your philosophy of branding? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Well, I mean, I’m a writer by trade, so my goal is to sell. So some of that may be embellished a bit, I’m joking. No. So, I mean, it’s interesting. I think given my background, it made the job with BlackBerry just a really good fit. I grew up in the agency world. 20 some years as a writer, as a creative director, leading teams, building agencies, selling work, and then I stepped client side and that was with Veritas, which was a great experience, rebuilding that brand and building the creative team But I think what’s true of almost every creative person or person who grew up in the agency background is the ability to problem-solve. And I think my unique perspective allows me to do that. 

And I think with the BlackBerry role the root of the problem was the perception of the brand. I mean, people still perceive them as handhelds. And we knew that based on traffic on the website, 70% of the traffic was going to devices talking to analysts, blah, blah, blah, blah. So the root of the problem was the story and me being a writer that was the project that fell in my lap. It’s like, “Wow, this is an amazing opportunity.” But I’d say given background, diverse client experience from consumer to tech, to B2B, I mean, you name it, I’ve operated in all different categories. And I think that has served me very well on the client side. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Just before we talk about BlackBerry in more detail, what did you take away from the Veritas experience that has informed the way that you think about the rebranding job that you have to do on BlackBerry now? I mean, you were the only creative director responsible for the global rebrand of Veritas. You were managing all agency partnerships and building out an in-house creative team as well, what was that experience like? And what was your main takeaway from that experience that has informed the way that you think about what you’re doing now at BlackBerry? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yeah, I think the big thing, what I like to say is when I went client-side, I grew up. On the agency side, it’s all driven and fueled by creative. It is a little bit of a wild west, so to speak. I mean, it’s not as true as Mad Men depicts, because that was the 60s, but there are things that haven’t changed. But when you step into an organization I mean, Veritas is roughly 7,000 people, almost a $3 billion business. It’s no longer about creative. It’s about the business. What are you creating? What are you making to help fuel revenue growth? So on and so forth. Where on the agency side, absolutely, you want to be strategic, you want good creative, and then lastly you want that to be effective. 

I think stepping into the corporate world, it’s the flip of that. What are we doing to drive business? And then is it well-articulated? Is it strategic? Is it this, is it that? So I think that Veritas served me very, very well before I went to BlackBerry and it’s like, “Okay, everything I create needs to drive impact.” Not just beautifully executed. And to me, that was a big learning experience where being a creative guy in the agency side, you live and you die by the work. If the work sucks, you’re out of a job; if the work’s great you’re employed. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Well, let’s talk about BlackBerry in a bit more detail then because you became VP of Corporate Marketing in June 2020, just last year in the height of Coronavirus. So you were responsible for all things repositioning of the brand from, I guess, a once loved or probably the most beloved mobile handset manufacturer to now be positioning the company as a leader in IoT and cybersecurity. So the first question is why did the company make that shift? And what are the main implications, both positive and negative for the way the brand is repositioning itself in such a fundamental way? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yep. So I mean the big reason John repositioned the company is because of Apple. I think at some point, John said, “BlackBerry is bleeding between a billion and 1.5 billion a quarter.” Apple was eating their lunch. I mean, it’s the perfect ecosystem. So what John realized is like, “Okay, these devices are super, super-secure. Can I take that security, pair it with machine learning and artificial intelligence and put that in other things?” And he pivoted the company. And it was a monumental task actually, because only did he move from consumer to B2B, he moved from hardware to software. Which is, I mean, pretty amazing and turned the company around in a quarter. I think he had one quarter to turn it around. 

And then from me stepping in that happened about seven years ago. And then me stepping in it was really figuring out how do you take all of that equity and all of that passion, all of that love for such an iconic brand, not dilute it, but reposition it? And as we thought through that, we came to the conclusion like, “Wow, okay. We go out with this new brand, people see that logo, they’re going to immediately want to see a device.” They’re not going to see a device. How in the world would we solve that? And after a lot of internal interviews, a lot of customer conversations, a lot of analyst conversations. What I learned, which I did not know, is that those devices were powerful and they made people productive because they were secure. And that’s why John pivoted the company. 

And I’m like, “Okay. So technically we’ve been in the security game for about 30 years.” Nobody knew that. So for me as a writer, it’s like, “Okay, how do you bridge security in everything, and that handheld?” And to me it was secure, you held it in the palm of your hand it’s now in everything you touch. And it was that human element. And that was the underlying line or message that we wanted to communicate as we rewrote the corporate narrative as we pushed this brand out. But it’s a very simple line, but it’s a very hardworking line and it doesn’t lose any of that equity that BlackBerry had. The trust factor is still there, but it also educates everybody, like, “Wow, I remember that device. Oh, it was security? Let me learn a little more about this.” And I think some of the best advertising in the world is when you can actually learn something. So that was the operating line that we started with, security held in your hand is now and everything you touch. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

That’s really fascinating. So as you say, people once trusted BlackBerry to deliver amazing handheld devices and experiences. But how does that translate to cybersecurity where the implications for getting it wrong are significant? If a hack occurs for a large or mid-size organization, it could be the end of the organization. How do you feel consumers and businesses are able to make the leap from, yes, great, fantastic devices in the palm of my hand, and once a leader in this space to now protecting my business from cyber hackers internationally, wherever they may be? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yeah, absolutely. Well, I think the trust factor is like, “Okay, we enabled, we actually created the mobile workforce.” I mean that’s a large, large group of people. And then I think, “All right, explaining that idea of a secure handheld, now partnering that, or marrying that with artificial intelligence and AI, the trust factor is all already built in.” It’s just making sure people understand that the device was secure and now we’re doing this. And then in order to back that up, of course, we have all the proof points, 175 million cars, 500 million endpoints were in the International Space Station, seven out of the G7 governments, some of the top financial institutions. So the credibility and the proof points are all there. And it was funny as- 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Check, check, check. 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yeah, exactly. As I was learning this, I remember when Mark Wilson hired me, I’m like, “Damn man, this is the greatest story that’s never been told. It’s amazing.” And I think that the challenge always was, is connecting that device heritage, which was security, and now literally in everything you come in contact with. And to me being a writer, it was a big challenge, no doubt about it. But my job is to distill things and make things very, very simple. And I was able to do that, obviously with a good team around me as well, but how do you distill this? Because it can be very, very confusing. I mean, the world of cybersecurity, it’s like, “Oh my gosh, talk to me as a person that speeds and feeds.” And also, I think given the fact that we were a consumer brand, there’s still a big human element to that. And bringing that to the table and letting people know what we do today. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

So speaking about making things as simple as possible, your value proposition is, intelligent security everywhere. How did you arrive at that value prop? And what does it mean for your customers? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

So that was a tagline that was scripted prior to my arrival, which I wish I came up with, because it’s a really, really hard-working line. I mean, it’s three words. But what I love about it is it checks off on everything we do. And instead of saying artificial intelligence, BMW never said the ultimate car, it’s the driving machine. So intelligent, I think is a really, really nice word it’s shorthand for AI or machine learning. So making sure that that is forefront. We’re using artificial intelligence to do what we do. Security. We want you to know it’s a security company. And then everywhere is the proof point, again, International Space Station, 175 million cars, so on and so forth. But what I also really, really about it, it’s a hard-working line, it’s a simple line, it’s only three words. Everything we do from a brand perspective gets run through that lens. Are we communicating AI? Are we communicating security? Are we talking about everywhere? And everything we do needs to be run through that filter. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

So you said a moment ago that BlackBerry essentially sort of created the mobile workforce. I’m not sure exactly how you phrased it, but that’s essentially the sentiment. Early 2000s, BlackBerry was ubiquitous, everywhere. Every business person around the world was super-psyched because they had email on their phone for the first time ever. How do you think about now engaging a younger audience, a millennial audience who, in their minds, only know Apple and Samsung? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Well, I mean, when it comes to security, I mean, we need to appeal to all divisions and the way that we look at the brand, again, it goes back to that dual pivot that John did from hardware to software, and then from consumer to enterprise. And our audience in a strange way is kind of the world. Because if you think about who we were, we were a consumer brand. And if people are sharing the wrong message or no message, it’s definitely not going to help our brand. So when we came out with a brand, it really was educating the world. And the way that we’ve architected that is Wall Street and the business world and our former consumer audience. Okay. It’s big, Wall Street Journal. It’s the New York Times, it’s mass media. 

We haven’t done broadcast yet. So we’re looking for the real estate to tell that story. And then we get hyper, hyper-targeted. That’s the CSOs, that’s the CTOs that’s the CIOs through digital channels. But at that top line, it’s really speaking to everybody, no matter what age group they’re in. Really no matter where they do business because we want to make sure people are sharing the right message. Because if they’re not, that’s not doing the brand any justice. And what starts to happen is your competition starts to write the story for you. So that’s how we’ve looked at it, not so much based on specific demographics, but at that broad macro level, the masses. But then hyper, hyper-targeted through digital, that’s your CSOs that’s your CTOs that’s your CIOs. 

Now, I think a modern brand needs to be relevant. If you look at modern design, we’re absolutely employing those best practices from a web experience, from a UX experience, making sure that it’s mobile-optimized, making sure that’s a great experience for everybody. And I think that brands nowadays, it’s no longer based on the audience. It’s really what’s based on the user experience and that’s across the board. Is it engaging? Is it delightful? Is it educational? And really thinking through things like that, because when I arrived with our website, it wasn’t fully, mobile-optimized. And I’m like, “Oh wow, 50% of the traffic’s coming through mobile. We have to fix that. We have to fix it immediately.” But really thinking through those things, because a brand, it no longer is the message you broadcast. It’s really a two-way street. And how are you putting something in the world? And how are people bringing you something back? 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

So you mentioned a moment ago that, or at least you mentioned the first time that we spoke that BlackBerry is a brand that people have been waiting to hear from for years now. And the question that I have in my mind is sort of what makes you think that? What are the assumptions behind sort of arriving at that point? Because in today’s day and age, people and brands are forgotten very, very quickly. The speed of the internet and new brands arriving on the scene every 24 hours, people have very short attention spans. People have very short time horizons. What makes you so confident that people have been waiting for BlackBerry all this time? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Well, I think you said it earlier, you loved your BlackBerry. And I think, I mean, for me, it’s not so much about brand relevance; it’s about brands that matter. And that has that head-heart component. It’s the emotional with the rational. And I think that brands that did something that mattered to the world really never go away. I mean, they might pivot their business. They might frame up their message to the market. They might show up with a new look and feel, but the fact that they matter, I don’t think goes away. I mean, you have to stay relevant as a business. And I think we more than done that, but we mattered then. And my gosh, given the amount of ransomware attacks, the malicious code that’s being created on a daily basis, we probably matter more than ever now. If you look at the DarkSide ransomware attack that it just happened with the Colonial Pipeline, even more so now than we did back then. 

And I just think there’s something that’s nostalgic about seeing, and I was sharing the story with Mark Wilson as I pulled in to the BlackBerry office in San Ramon, because I started in interviewing right before COVID. And I remember when I pulled up to the office, I didn’t so much remember the logo, I remembered those berries. And it was reverie. It immediately sent me back to that scroll wheel device that I had. And it was like, “Wow.” And I think there’s something special about that. And I think it will rekindle, as you said, a love that people had for that device. And also, I remember sitting and talking at length with John about this, and I’m like, “I just have to ask this. And I don’t know a lot of the background was there ever a discussion about changing the name of the company?” He’s like, “Oh, a lot, a whole lot.” 

And his rationale was there’s equity in the name. People just don’t know what we do today. But he said something that I thought was even more important. Nobody hated their blackberries. There was no negative connotation. So why change something that was loved? And it’s like, “Absolutely dude.” So based on what you said, based on how I reacted, as I pulled up to the office… And it was funny when we were writing the narrative, we went three rounds with John. And I remember in the second round, we would go in with three scripts and we’re thinking about this or thinking about that. And he goes, “I just want to float something by you and see what you think. Can we say we changed the world?” I said, “Okay, let’s unpackage that a little bit.” And he goes, “Well, if you think about the mobile workforce, 40 hours a week, we set them free. We liberated them.” I’m like, “To me, I’d say that’s changing the world.” And it was- 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Ding in the universe there, not to Steve Jobs? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yeah. Exactly. But no, when he said that, it was like, “Wow, we are a brand that mattered. And now how do we make ourselves matter in this day and age?” But yeah, that was one of the things where Mark Wilson, our CMO had talked at length about it. It’s like, “Wow, this is an enormous opportunity. And we’ll probably see a hockey stick, but man, we got to get it right. We have to get it right out of the gate.” Just because there’s so much equity in that name. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Sure. Massive. So from your point of view, massive opportunity, very exciting, but also a lot of risk involved in it as well because you’re dealing with a brand that’s a lot of equity, loved and beloved for many, many, many years. How do you view the challenge and the opportunity in front of you? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Well, I mean, I think those are the best opportunities where there’s a fair margin of failure and success. It’s almost equally- 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Risk and reward? Right. 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yeah, yeah. It’s almost equally weighted, but maybe I’m a bit biased because I did grow up as a writer, but I think if you start with a great story and I think there’s lots of ways to redo a brand. And I think where companies sometimes are a bit short-sighted is when they only look at it through a design lens. Design is important, I mean, Apple has made that imperative. But also story, I think, is maybe a little more important because I think when you get the story right, that transcends just the brand. I mean, I think that impacts sales like, “How are they explaining what we do to a potential customer? How does that appear on the website? How do I talk to a client? How do we talk to Wall Street? How do I talk to an analyst?” And I think getting that right, so everybody is reading from the same script is really, really, really important. And then it’s like, “Okay, how do we make it beautiful? How do we make it engaging? How do we do all that?” 

But I think you reduce some of the risk as long as you get the idea and the story right. And I mean, obviously, we spent a lot of time on this, like, “How are people going to react when they see the logo when they don’t see the device? How does this show up on the website? How do we talk at a brand level, but how do we talk to a cybersecurity audience, an IoT audience, a critical event management audience?” And really thinking through those scenarios. And to me, it all goes back to the security you held in your hand is now on everything you touch. And it’s just ridiculously simple. And I think after we nailed that and we started seeing people’s reactions like, “Wow, that’s a really good line. I get it.” The race was off, so to speak. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Mm-hmm (affirmative). So you talked about the story that you’ve architected, you’ve talked about how you’re going to distribute that story to your core audiences, which is essentially everybody, because you’ve got a consumer audience and also a business audience, which is super-fascinating. And then you talked about the channels as well that you’re going to use to reach them. What does success look like? How are you measuring success and what does success look like on the basis of this brand campaign? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yeah. Well, I do think it’s true brand is the long tale. That’s built over time. I mean, it’s a consistent message, a consistent look total over time. It’s no tough mathematical equation. I went to design school and I can figure that out. It’s a really simple formula to get there. The only way to truncate that time is media budget. More money gets more frequency, gets more reach, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But I think there are things that you can do in the short-term to make sure that the brand is working. We focus-grouped it, we talked to customers, we talked to analysts, we talked to businesses to make sure that, all right, we’re not drinking our own Kool-Aid, this is actually going to resonate. And then in the short-term success is impressions, how many people are we reaching in the first quarter? It was roughly 70 million impressions, which is amazing. 

We want people that understand that security message. Then we’d look at drivers to the website, direct traffic is up 80%. That means somebody is seeking us out based on the brand being out there. We have done the New York Times. We’ve done the Wall Street Journal. So a lot of that is your traditional media, but people are seeking us out, which is amazing. And then you start to look at time on the website, engagement on the website. We launched a news drawer that talks about the latest breaches. All the engagement on that is up, contact sales is right there, engagement on that is up. So we’re going to fill pipeline with that four fields. 

So that’s how I look at a brand. It’s not pure impressions in the short term, but also, is engagement up? Is time on site up? Because if that’s not happening, we have to really look at what we’re doing and is it the right thing? And then even before we went on this journey, we did a brand study. And what I wanted to figure out is where do we sit in the cybersecurity space? And then also, is there any equity in that tagline? Intelligent security everywhere. And there was. When we polled people, it’s like, “Who do you associate with this tagline?” And we gave them a list. So it was aided, it wasn’t unaided. And we were number three next to Microsoft and IBM. I would love to have been number one, but number three is not bad in that company. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Sure. 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Yeah, so we knew there was some equity in that, it’s like, “Okay.” So after all this has been in market for roughly a year, we’ll do another brand study and have we moved that needle? Have we penetrated the cybersecurity market? Have we gotten lift? Have we done everything we set out to do? So, that will be a longer-term play. And then I think once we’ve shifted that perception from device to cybersecurity, we go all in on intelligent security everywhere, and we start to really educate the masses on why AI-driven security is paramount in the height of ransomware attacks and threats and so on and so forth. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Super-exciting opportunity ahead of you, Brian. And yeah, it’s really fascinating to hear everything that the company is doing at the moment. The last couple of questions and then I’ll let you go. I’m going to ask you to get your crystal ball out now. So if everything has gone well in the next five to 10 years and BlackBerry are a leader in cybersecurity and IoT, what would have had to have happened in order for that to have happened? If that makes sense. 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

I think if you ask anybody on the street, “What does BlackBerry do?” “Oh, they’re a security company.” Obviously of course, with the CSOs, CTOs, CIOs, but also the masses. I mean, because right now, I mean, I’ll share a funny story. I’ve shared this in the past, when the recruiter called me about this gig and I was like, “They’re still in business? Okay.” Oh, they do… And then my next question was like, “Oh, I haven’t seen a device from them in ages.” “Well, they don’t do that anymore.” “Okay.” I mean, even when I’m recruiting people, it’s like, “Oh BlackBerry. Where’s the device?” 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Where’s the phone? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Exactly. Exactly. So to me, that’s the true test. And again, I mean, keeping things simple, people notice it’s a cybersecurity company and no longer a handset manufacturer. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Mm-hmm (affirmative). What do you think has to happen in the next six to 12 months in order for the vision to be on track? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

I think it’s doing what we’re doing because we have good products. I mean, our products are so great. Actually, the ransomware group DarkSide actually cited our Cylance protect product as stopping them. Oh my gosh, that’s the kind of endorsement you want. I mean, from the bad guys, it’s like, “Oh my gosh.” I mean, again, it’s the greatest story that hasn’t been told. I mean, I think in the next six to 12 months we stay the course, we keep doing what we’re doing. We come out with great products in the cybersecurity space. We have the partnership with Amazon and that’s IVY, that’s in the industry, that’s IoT. And for me, it’s just making sure that that message is consistent and we’re reaching the audiences we need to reach and we’re just blanketing the world with it. 

 

But yeah, I wouldn’t change anything up at this stage of the game. I mean, I think there’s some stuff that we need to do on the website. I would always want more media dollars to continue to push the message. But I think it’s innovating our products, which we are doing, and just making sure that they’re the best they can be. Because like I said, I don’t think there’s ever been a better time to do what we do. And that is now. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Super-fascinating, Brian. And thank you for sharing your story with us and the story of BlackBerry’s evolving service offering and value proposition. Final question before we let you go, you’ve had a fascinating career across agency clients and multiple sort of tier-one brands. What advice would you give to aspiring brand/technology leaders on how best to navigate their careers? 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

I mean, when I started, I wanted to be at the hottest creative agency. And what I quickly learned, it’s like, “Okay, those are mostly big agencies.” And then I thought through it, it’s like, “Okay, if I get in there, I’m going to be a junior, where can I make the most impact?” And I think that’s how people want to look at the job market. “Where can I get in and where can I make impact?” And I think for what I do, it’s just like, “Wow, okay. A brand, everybody sees that. That drives sales, that drives business that does that.” But I think it’s really looking at where you can make impact. I mean, obviously doing something that you love, as they say, you’ll never work a day in your life. I think that’s all table stakes. But I think getting in with a place that is making an impact, and I said this earlier, a company that matters to the world. 

Because I think in this day and age if you’re just making shit that can be thrown out, it’s like, “Really? Okay.” I mean the cybersecurity space protecting people, that idea of safety, as a business, as human beings, I think it’s so important. It’s really important. But I think there are so many interesting companies out there doing things that matter. What I would look at is like, “Okay, how can you impact that business? And also do something that’s rewarding?” I mean, we can sell shit ’till the cows come home, but do something that matters to the world. I think it’s pretty amazing. I think in this day and age too, there are a lot of those companies. It’s no longer just pumping out stuff that people will buy. 

It’s like, “All right, why does it truly matter to the world?” But going back to that idea of where can you impact the business? Where can you change people’s lives? I mean, going back to what John Chen threw on the table, can we be about changing the world? That’s like, “Wow. Okay. That’s pretty big. That’s pretty important.” So… 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Absolutely. Love it. Brian, thank you so much for being on ClientSide. 

 

Brian Clevenger: 

Awesome. Thanks for having me. I really appreciate your time. 

 

Nathan Anibaba: 

If you’d like to share any comments on this episode or any episode of ClientSide, then find us online at fox.agency. If you’d like to appear as a guest on the show, please email Zoe at fox.agency. The people that make the show possible are Jennifer Brennan, our Booker slash Researcher. David Claire is our Head of Content. Ben Fox is our Executive Producer. I’m Nathan Anibaba, and you’ve been listening to ClientSide from Fox Agency. 

 

Speaker 1: 

Join us next time on ClientSide. Brought to you by Fox Agency.