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Tech marketing: content that sells

Giorgia Guantario, Senior Content Marketing Manager
Gamma

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Giorgia Guantario
"Technology makes a difference not just in the way we work, but the way we conduct business, and it changes your customer experience. It can change so much." 

Giorgia Guantario is the Content Marketing Manager at Gamma, a UCaaS provider that uses tech to help companies collaborate at speed in the cloud. Chatting alongside host Nathan Anibaba, the pair delve into trending topics such as gated content, thought leadership, and making content with purpose. Listen in to ensure your marketing is adding value, and making readers want to know more through avid storytelling.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: 

This is ClientSide from Fox Agency. 

Speaker 2: 

(singing). 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Giorgia Guantario is the content marketing manager at Gamma, a leading unified communications as a service provider, helping businesses communicate and collaborate. A former journalist and passionate tech writer, Giorgia translates Gamma’s mission and vision into compelling content that educates and engages audiences. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Giorgia Guantario, welcome to ClientSide. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Thank you for having me, Nathan. It’s great to be here with you. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Absolute pleasure to have you on. We’ve tried this a couple of times. There are no trees being cut outside your house anymore, so we can speak. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Definitely. Yeah, its been a crazy week. Lots of things happening outside here in [Putney 00:00:53] of all places. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Well, let’s talk about your background and history first, before we get into Gamma, because you’ve got a fascinating background. You get your degree in journalism from the University of Sheffield. How does that journalistic background shape the way that you think about marketing in your career today? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

That’s a very good question. I think I grew up wanting to be a journalist, and the reality of journalism is very different when you get into it, but I’m still very great grateful of having done that degree. First of all, the university I went to, there is a lot of practical skills they teach you. So from the basics of writing, obviously, as a journalist, but also video editing, filming, audio and podcasts. We did radio shows as well, in the degree, so there is a lot of that. 

There are also [inaudible 00:01:43] content marketing and what I’m doing now. But the core of what I learned, and I think that kind of translates to what I’m doing in content marketing, is that telling our story and finding the story, that the key of journalism is finding that angle, finding something that people are interested in, and I think content marketing is very similar in that sense. You always want to find what your audience is interested in, what’s the angle that they’re going to be wanting to read or watch or whatever it is that they’re doing. 

And besides that, it’s not being afraid of asking questions as well, and that research side of things, which is the fundamental of content marketing. If you haven’t done your research, if you cannot ask the right questions, if you’re not sure what your audience is interested in, well, there is no point in writing any content for any business. So I think that’s what I got from journalism and what translated into my day to day in content marketing. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

And then fast forward a few years, and your career took you to Dubai. What was that experience like? It must have been quite a formative, strong experience to have quite early on in your career. What did you take away from that experience? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, Dubai was definitely interesting, that’s for sure. This must be said that I started my career in marketing, but I wanted to be a journalist, as I said, and then Dubai was that opportunity. I got a job there as a deputy editor for a B2B tech magazine called [CNME 00:03:09]. I think it’s still running, if anyone wants to go and have a look. But it was a great experience, I loved my job there. It was interesting, it was challenging at times. Definitely taught me that international outlook and working with people from different cultures and different way of workings as well. From the more stupid things like they, at least before, when I was there, they used to work from Sunday to Thursday, which is very different than in Europe, but it’s also that networking aspect in Dubai is very prominent, is very much who you know sometimes. And I mean, as it is many times in journalism. 

And then obviously my job was in tech at the time, and I worked with some of the best companies in the industry. We interviewed people at Microsoft, went to lots of their launch events. I was there when they launched their data center in the region. I went to China with Huawei for their annual conference. So I went to their HQ, which is insane, it’s the most amazing place I’ve ever seen in my life. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

I can imagine. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, they have a train running through it, which is brilliant. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

A train? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, to get to one place or one part of the HQ to another. It’s insane, it’s absolutely brilliant. Yeah, absolutely insane. But as a journalist, I think that’s literally gold. You get to talk to such interesting and very clever people, and learn so much from them.  

Obviously, there is this whole writing side, and writing a good article from that, but it’s also how much you learn. And through that job I got the job I’m in now, because if I didn’t have that experience, I don’t think Gamma would’ve hire me back. But its kind of made me fall in love with tech all over again, and I’m just very much stuck in it now. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

So talk about Gamma, your senior content marketing manager at Gamma. Tell us a little bit more about the company and the problems that you solve for your customers. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, of course. A bit of history, Gamma started as a telecom 20 years ago this year, and we have very much evolved into, I say, more of a tech company. We’re a leading UCaaS provider, UCaaS is unified communications as a service, which is jargon for your team Zoom, like using a tool that makes collaborating, communicating a bit more efficient, and kind of is all in one place. That’s the unified part of it. 

What we do for customers is, as I said, is simplifying the way they communicate and collaborate within their business role, so externally. We don’t just do unified communications as a service, we do contact centers as a service so that customer experience side of things. We have our own network, which is a quite cool thing, which means we can upgrade it, we can release upgrades very quickly, we have that total control over our network, which is very rare in the UK. We’re expanding to Europe quite quickly as well, so that’s quite cool. But yeah, essentially it’s making businesses communicate better. 

Our customer base is very vast. It goes from the micro market, which is your sort of trader to enterprise and public sector, so it’s different problems that need to be addressed in different ways, especially from a content point of view. It’s a different message, it’s a different way, that they consume the content. A micro business might not read a white paper. If you are hairdresser, you’re definitely not going to read a white paper about unified communications. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Sure. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

So it’s tailoring that content to the different audiences. 

And then we also, something that is worth saying, is we sell directly, but we also work through our network channel partners, which is very big. So it’s also enabling them and giving them the tools to be able to reach their customer, and we have a platform to do that and help them through that journey. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

And as content marketing manager for the company, what are you responsible for? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Good question. A bit of history on the role, and I feel like I’m giving lots of history on my experience, but I’m the first content marketing manager at the company, which means it’s a very new role. I think when I was hired, it probably wasn’t clear what my role would be, and its evolved quite quickly. I’ve been at the company a year and a half now, and it started with create a white paper, create an e-guide, to now I’m in charge of the whole content strategy, the whole leadership strategy, and I work quite closely with the social media team to make sure that that message gets out properly. 

The day to day is very much creating a lot of content. I have one person in my team, so it’s not a very big team. And we do a lot of things in-house. We have the capabilities, we have the skills, so why not? So there is the video creation, the writing blogs, white papers, e-guides, and what not. Infographics as well. 

And then the whole strategic side is working with the product marketing team to make sure that the product messaging is reflecting the content that we create, is working with our creative market teams, which are the [inaudible 00:08:16] directing channel, and making sure that each of their audiences get what they’re interested in and what they would consume. 

And then working on the product side is obviously a big thing, it’s how do we translate that product into content that people want to read? 

Nathan Anibaba: 

What’s the role of content marketing today, and especially for a company like Gamma, what’s the purpose of the content that you’re creating for Gamma? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

That’s a very good question. I think you’ll get a different answer from any content marketing manager or marketer that you’ll interview at this point. But to me, and this is what I’m passionate about, I think the main objective of content marketing will be to build that story around the brand. It’s making sure that people want to work with you, want your product. It’s making sure they understand what you stand for and what you’re trying to help them achieve. So it’s very much a brand awareness tool, to make sure that your company purpose and mission and vision is reflected externally, as well as possible. 

And then obviously there is the lead gen side, which is obviously what we all …. There is [inaudible 00:09:26] if we get leads is great. But I do think where content can really make a difference is making sure that you create that … Inspire your audience. You create that loyalty and trust for them to come back to you. And as I always say, it’s a slow process with content. It’s very unlikely that someone will read a blog or read an article, and be like, “Oh great, I’m going to buy from this company.” That just doesn’t happen. 

But it’s reading that story, that experience for them, that they learn from you and they understand you’re an expert in what you do, and that’s when they come back and keep buying from you. And then they go to their friends and say, “Oh, did you read that article from that company?” And maybe they’ll have an issue and they’ll solve it through that blog. That’s how you get them to be interested in what you do. 

So yeah, I think, to me, brand awareness and building that brand story is the main purpose of content marketing. And then I think lead gen comes when you do that well, doesn’t it? If you have build a story you will generate leads. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

So, talk to me about the importance of content marketing in the mix, because isn’t all marketing content marketing at some stage, at some kind of scale? You could argue that where we are now in the world, we’ve got a avalanche, an overload of marketing. I mean, we’re creating content right here with this podcast. There’s never been so much content available to people, it’s ubiquitous, it’s getting easier and cheaper to make, there are more and more companies that have the ability to do it, its been democratized. How do you make sure that your audience see your content when there’s so much content out there? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

That’s a very good question. I think the first part, this first thing you said is all marketing is content marketing. I think, yes, I don’t think that all content is content marketing, and I don’t think that content marketing is the same as marketing with content. I think content marketing differs from just content, because it has, first of all, very clear objectives. I can’t say this enough. If anyone comes to me and says, “I want to do a video.” I tell him, “What do you want to achieve?” Because that’s not content marketing if you just say, “I’m going to produce a video today.” 

It’s what do you want to achieve? And you start from that, and then you decide what’s your audience, what’s your format? It can’t just start with, “We need to create five blogs a week,” because it needs to create, as I said, that experience, it needs to be consistent, it needs to give your audience a feel that they are part of something at the end of the day, and that something is what your company stands for, what’s the purpose, and how does that purpose and vision and mission reflect into what they’re needing at that point in time. 

But as I said, it can’t be just doing content for the sake of it, that’s not content marketing to me. I think you need to have a very strong content strategy in place. And it doesn’t come just from … This is something I truly believe in. It doesn’t just come from the content marketing team. I don’t believe that any business that I, as a content marketing manager, tells them, “Do a content strategy.” As an individual, it’s never going to be successful. 

Content marketing comes from what’s your company objectives, which comes from your [SLT 00:12:40] or whatever it is. It comes from what is your sales team looking? What do they see in the market? What are the customer’s pain points? What does product marketing want to achieve and what’s the product messaging that needs to be reflecting compared to those pain points? It’s a company project and a company vision that needs to be achieved through content marketing. It’s not by an individual. I always say this, I wouldn’t do my job very well if I just sat down in front of my laptop with my one direct report and say, “Okay, we’re going to talk about this this month, for no reason.” I have weekly call with my product marketing team who are great at what they do, I have weekly call with the digital team who’s actually such an important part of content marketing. Your distribution. Do you know how you’re distributing content? Do you know every month how that content performs on your distribution channels? If you don’t know that, you’re not going anywhere. 

So it’s not a siloed experience, it needs to be very much part of what that company marketing team, product marketing team, your SLT, they all need to be involved in the content you’re producing. Because the content is what the customer sees, so at the end of the day, if that content doesn’t reflect what the company wants to achieve, you’re not going anywhere 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Really interesting. A few years ago, in the early days of content marketing, everyone gated their content. I say everyone … That was the way that people did content marketing. They put up an e-guide, they put up a webinar, they put a form in front of it, fill out the form and let’s generate these leads. 

That seems to have changed in the last few years where people are a little bit more flexible and there’s more ungated content out there, or a mix between the two. What’s your approach to gating content, ungating content? Is all your content gated? Is all of it ungated? What’s the mix between the two, and does it differ depending on the type business that you are? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

I don’t think there is a wrong or right answer in terms of should content be gated or ungated. I think it very much depends on the position your company’s at, the maturity level your company’s at. I think you said something earlier in one of your questions about the saturation of content. I think that’s the main issue. There is a lot out there, and I can guarantee that if you’ve written something that is the same as someone else, and that person has it ungated and you have it gated, your customer or audience is going to go to the ungated one. Because it’s much easier. You don’t have to put in your information, it’s the same content, I learn the same thing. Doesn’t matter. At least I don’t have to give them my content details. And privacy is a big thing nowadays, I get that. I’m the first one to either use a fake email or just try to find something that I don’t have to enter my email in. 

As I said, I think it depends where you are as a company. I was at Gamma many years ago, I was in the digital team at the time, and I remember we gave all of our content … And it worked at the time. We realized at the moment we don’t gate it quite as much. You can imagine with the pandemic, an industry like the unified communication industry, it was a boom. There is a lot of content out there about hybrid working, about working environment, what tools you need. So it’s much harder to stand down in that sea of information, because of what the pandemic created. 

As I said, I think it comes down to your maturity level, to the uniqueness of your content as well. I’m a big fan of primary research. If you can do very interesting primary research, a hundred percent gate it, because if you are the only one that is asking that question and has the stats to back up, yeah, absolutely gate it, and people will be interested- 

Nathan Anibaba: 

It’s valuable. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, exactly. And that’s the thing, it’s the value of the content. Is it unique? Is it valuable? Is it going to add something to the conversation? If you’re writing based on someone else’s facts or stats or whatever, don’t gate it. Because it’s already out there. You’re not adding anything to the conversation, there isn’t any uniqueness to it. 

And coming down to that maturity level that I said earlier, I think it’s much easier for a brand that is already established and people want to learn from to gate their content. I’ll give you an example. Microsoft, big business, hybrid working, they do it very well. Teams is one of the tools that everybody uses at the moment. But if they did the content, I’ll probably give them my content details. It’s Microsoft, they know what they’re doing. 

If I’m a startup and no one knows who I am, it’s very unlikely I will go out of my way to get data content, because I’m like, “I have no idea who these people are. What’s their authority to talk about this subject?” So I think if you’re not at that maturity level in your marketing journey, it’s probably easier to be ungated, and least you get someone to read your content, then you create that experience that I was talking about, that consistency, and they’ll come back to you if it’s great content anyway. 

But yeah, it’s what you said. Is it valuable? If it’s not valuable content, it doesn’t add to the conversation that’s already out there. If it’s not unique, I don’t see the point in gating your content. It is very unlikely you’ll ever get any leads or any contact details from your audience, and it might be more valuable to just have them read it free, and then come back to you at some other point. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

So, you spoke about Microsoft there a moment ago. I know that Microsoft are a competitor to Gamma in some instances, and Gamma actually, I think for a lot of people listening, is actually probably one of the biggest companies that most people have never heard of. Absolutely huge company. We worked with Gamma, actually, when I was in another agency many years ago, in another lifetime, but I know Gamma quite well from that experience. I don’t know whether many of the people listening to this would know, and would know the competitive service offerings that allow you to go head to head with the likes of Microsoft. What are Gamma doing about increasing their profile, increasing the role of their brand, and the importance that thought leadership plays in doing that? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Absolutely. I will start by saying with Microsoft, we’re actually a Microsoft gold partner, so we work very closely with Microsoft at the moment. Their Teams … I’ll get into a techy bit now, then I’ll go back to the marketing site. But Teams doesn’t have calling capabilities, so you can’t call externally, essentially. The basics is that you can only do internal calls within your business. To allow your users or your platform to do that, you can either get something called Microsoft Calling Plans, which is by Microsoft, they offer them. They are very expensive, unfortunately. So the other options there are through telecom providers like us. So we work with Microsoft to develop those options. We have quite a few different flavours, and I’m not going to get into the tech, but I think that the one that has been talked about the most at the moment is something called Operator Connect. 

Operator Connect is a program by Microsoft, which allows providers to work directly with them and to enable that calling capability through their Microsoft admin centre. And we’re one of the very, very few, I think it’s less than 10 in the UK that work with Microsoft in the Operator Connect program at the moment. 

So yes, they’re a competitor from a point of view, but actually we work very closely with them, and we’re really appreciative of the relationship we have with Microsoft and their team. Its been a great journey to have with them. 

So, going back to the marketing side of this and thought leadership, the reason I was hired is because of that. You said it right. I don’t want to say no one knows about Gamma, I think we’re very well known in this industry. We are B2B, which is always harder to know B2B than it is to know B2C, so that doesn’t help. But the reason I was hired is to elevate that profile and to make sure that people actually know about Gamma, not just from a selling point of view, but also from talent acquisition. It’s a great company to work at. I’ve done it twice, so I should know, and we want people to come to us and be like, “I really want to work for Gamma.” The same way you would go to Microsoft or Google and be like, “I really want to work for that company.” 

So that’s the reason I was hired. We’ve grown steadily over the years, and we have a huge marketing team at the moment. I think we’re almost 40 people in. Yeah, it’s because of their great marketing teams as well. And we are working quite hard to make sure that we elevate what we do from a thought leadership perspective, from a brand perception perspective, from a employee engagement perspective. We have a new marketing director that just came in, [Andrea Herbert 00:21:33]. She comes from a FinTech background, and she’s been working hard for the past two, three months to make sure that we elevate that brand. 

There are lots of conversations I’m doing with our SLT as well about our purpose and values as a company. So there is a lot going on in the background, and I’m hoping that the next year is going to be quite fruitful in the sense of elevating ourselves through that thought leadership. I think because it’s a fairly young company, 20 years is not that long at the end of the day, we’re still in the process of … We’re still learning and we’re still trying to grow. From my perspective as a content marketing manager, I strongly believe in thought leadership. I think you want to write stuff that is interesting to your audience and that proves that you’re an expert in what you’re talking about. And we have some of the most clever people in this company. I get to talk to some people that are just … Their brains, it’s insane. 

So far, we haven’t made the most of making sure that they’re out there talking to our audience, making sure that they can explain what we stand for. We’re changing that. One example is we have a web series, webcast type of thing, or video series more or less, called Gammabox. It’s fortnightly at the moment, and I interview someone in the company. So we started this year with our chief marketing product officer, Chris Wade, and we talked about a whole bunch of things, from the metaverse, is it going to stick? Is it going to change the way we work? To AI- 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Hot topic at the moment. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, it’s one of those things that people are interested in, that kind of relates to what we do, because as I said, how we work is our bread and butter. But it’s making sure that we’re in there, like we know what we’re talking about. We can talk about these things very easily and tell people this is what you should be looking forward to. One thing we talked about with Chris was 5G, and it’s a big one. We partner with Three UK, and we have the fastest 5G network in the UK. So it’s one of those things that it makes a difference, all this technology. Not just the way you work, the way you conduct your business, the way it changes your customer experience. It can change so much in the way we do business. And yeah, what I’m trying to do is just making sure that those people that are experts in what we do get a bit more visibility out there. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Love that. Well said. I can’t let you go without talking about women in tech. I know that you’re a passionate advocate for diversity and female leadership, especially in technology. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Absolutely. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

There are increasingly a lot more women in marketing these days, but still not that many in tech as we would like. What are the problems, what are the challenges that are stopping that? And what more can be the done about it? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Absolutely. I’m a big, … It’s easier for me. The one thing, I am a woman, I’m quite young, I’m also Caucasian, so that kind of helps. I think what we forget is there’s not just one type of woman out there, and it’s not the only type of issues with diversity we have out there. I think the tech industry is … There are a lot of guys, that’s for sure. A lot of men in telecom, which is where Gamma comes from even more. You’ll be surprised how many times I’ve been in a room and it’s literally just men. 

And it’s not easy, it is really not easy to speak up. We had a conversation with one of my managers, “What more can you do?” And there was a conversation where, “Oh, you tell me if there is an issue.” And I think that’s where a lot of companies go wrong. You can’t just expect women to speak up. It’s very difficult for women to speak up if there is an issue. And it might be something that they, as a woman … And there is a lot of women in marketing. As I said, most of my team around me is women, and a lot of them are quite young, and we talk about these issues quite a lot. It’s really difficult to go into the room and go to someone’s superior to you and say, “Actually, I don’t feel very comfortable because there is no one like me in a leadership role.” Because you always feel like you are just creating an issue in a sense, and growing up, you’re always taught to be nice and quiet and smile and whatnot. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Yeah. Don’t cause a problem, don’t cause an issue. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, exactly, exactly. So, I think a lot of businesses expect women to, “Oh, tell me if there is an issue.” I don’t have to tell you. There is an issue. We all know there is an issue. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

You should be able to see it. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Exactly. I’ll give you an example. I was at a pub with some coworkers, and someone told me that. And I was like, “Look, I’m the only woman here. You think there is an issue?” So there is no point in asking, “Is there an issue?” There is an issue. You need to do something about it. Give women a place to talk, give women a place to express themselves safely as well, without them asking you to give them a place to speak safely. Put more women in places of leadership. 

As I said, one of the marketing directors who just came in, Andrea, she’s a woman and it made such a difference to see someone that is such high up that is a woman, because it’s like you can see there’s someone like you that made it. And that makes a difference because it encourages you, it’s possible. I think, as you said, in marketing, it’s a bit easier to see there are marketing directors as women. In tech, it’s much harder. There aren’t many women in leadership positions that are women. 

Yeah, it’s not easy. I think you need to lead by example. You need to assume that there is always an issue even if no one tells you that there is an issue. And I’m not saying … I think there is also … Actually, something worth mentioning, I think unconscious bias is a big thing. I think we all have them, including women. So I think it’s important to do that, get your staff to training, to make sure your managers, especially, do training, make sure that they understand what they’re doing wrong. Because they might not realize they’re doing anything wrong, or they’re talking to a woman differently, or they are hiring people that are more like them. Because it’s normal. You want to hire people that are similar to you, they have similar experience. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Exactly. That’s the word, unconscious. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Yeah, exactly. But if you put them through training, you make sure that they can check themselves and actually stop and be like, “Am I just hiring this person just because they’re like me?” I think that already makes a difference. It’s a slow process. I’m not expecting that you should hire women just for the sake of it. But just check yourself, check where your company’s at, ask the question. Before anyone comes to you and be like, “Oh, there is an issue,” ask them if there is an issue, and ask them what more you can do to help with that. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Really well said. And final question before we let you go. As you reflect on your own career, as you said earlier, you’re still young, you’re relatively young, you’re growing within your career, but you’ve had a fantastic and fascinating career so far … 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Thank you. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

At such a young age. You’ve achieved really a lot in a short space of time. What advice do you have for other young people starting their careers in marketing and tech? 

Giorgia Guantario: 

That’s a very good question. I don’t know what I would’ve liked to hear when I just came out of uni. I think one thing I’ve learned is the company you’re at makes a lot of difference. I know that everybody has goals and dreams and whatnot, but sometimes life can take you in very different ways. As I said, I wanted to be a journalist, I think growing up I was like, “I want to work for Vogue,” or whatever it was. And that was never going to happen. That market is so saturated with people and it’s really hard to make it, and maybe I wasn’t good enough, who knows? But it’s one of those things. And I ended up at Gamma out of chance. I needed a job and I ended up at Gamma. That was my first job, and it made me fall in love with an industry that I didn’t think I would like as much. 

I think what I would say is don’t be afraid to try something different, or if you end up in something different, don’t just be like, “Actually, it’s not … ” Enjoy as much as possible, but also make the most of anything that comes your way. Dubai, for me, is the example. If I hadn’t gone to Dubai, I probably wouldn’t have this job, I wouldn’t have the outlook on technology that I have now. You can do a lot of stuff when you’re young, and you can’t later on in life, so just try as much as possible. 

And more practical stuff is try to get some work experience is always fundamental. If you have that work experience, it’s much easier to find that job and also to be good at that job right on. I think a lot of the times you start a job and you have no clue what you’re doing, so if you got a bit of work experience, at least you set that expectation, and you know what you’re going to get into. 

And there are lots of companies that offer work experience. Reach out. Networking is another thing that I would suggest. LinkedIn is great. I love LinkedIn, you can literally … I get messages sometimes from people, [inaudible 00:30:46], “I just wanted to ask you advice about this, about my career.” I was like, “Yeah, sure. I’ll give you … ” It takes a second and people are quite friendly on LinkedIn, so a hundred percent get on there. And if you like a company you want to work for, reach out to their hiring manager or to whoever it is in marketing or tech that you want to work with, and say, “What’s your advice to get a job at your company eventually?” Even if they’re not hiring, it doesn’t matter. Most companies will have eventually hire at some point, so you just want to make yourself known. 

I think networking is a massive thing at the moment. As I said earlier, a lot of times it’s who you know and who you cross paths with. I’ll give you a brief example. When I left Dubai, I was without a job for about a month. And I put on LinkedIn the fact that I was looking for a job. You can’t even imagine the amount of people that I interviewed at tech companies while I was in Dubai that reached out and said, “Well, if you want to work in marketing for us, just let me know.” I ended up at Gamma in the end, but I got lots and lots of people reaching out saying, “I want to help you. I want to give you a job.” Because, “I’ve met you for an interview. I met you at this event, and you sounded great.” 

So, just get out there, get to know people. There is lots of meetups in cities like London for marketers that want to meet and just exchange advice. Get to know many as people as possible, because a network is the best thing you can have to find the job that you like, honestly. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

Really well said, and a great place to end. Giorgia thank you so much for being on the show. 

Giorgia Guantario: 

Oh, thank you. It was lovely. 

Nathan Anibaba: 

If you’d like to share any comments on this episode or any episode of ClientSide then find us online at fox.agency. If you’d like to appear as a guest on the show, please email Zoey @fox.agency. 

The people that make this show possible are Jennifer Brennan], our booker/researcher, David Claire is our head of content, Ben Fox is our executive producer. I’m Nathan Anibaba. You’ve been listening to ClientSide. 

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